TechCrunch spotted an interesting security hire by Apple: the developer behind Edward Snowden’s recommended secure chat app is joining Apple as an intern.

Frederic Jacobs, a Switzerland-based developer who worked to develop secure messaging app Signal […] announced today that he is joining the Cupertino-based company this summer to work in its CoreOS security team. 

As the site notes, Signal passed every security test when put through its paces by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and you can’t really get a better endorsement than the fact that Snowden trusts it.

Apple is also ramping up its incredibly strong language in arguing its position against the FBI …

After Tim Cook said that creating the special code the FBI wanted would amount to the “software equivalent of cancer,” Gizmodo noted the analogy Apple used in it motion to vacate the court order.

Under the same legal theories advocated by the government here, the government could argue that it should be permitted to force citizens to do all manner of things “necessary” to assist it in enforcing the laws, like compelling a pharmaceutical company against its will to produce drugs needed to carry out a lethal injection in furtherance of a lawfully issued death warrant.

As we noted yesterday, Apple also cleverly refers to the code the FBI would like it to write as ‘GovtOS.’ Apple may not yet have persuaded the public (unlike 9to5Mac readers), but I’d have to say it’s winning the war of words.

You can catch up on anything you missed in our full coverage of the case to date.

  • U.S. judge orders Apple to help FBI access data on San Bernardino gunman’s iPhone 5c
  • Apple publishes letter responding to FBI iPhone unlock demand: ‘an unprecedented step which threatens the security of our customers’
  • Google CEO Pichai appears to side with Apple in series of vague tweets on FBI encryption battle
  • Security firm shows how Apple could bypass iPhone security to comply with FBI request
  • Opinion: How likely is Apple to succeed in resisting the FBI court order?
  • Should Apple comply with FBI request to bypass San Bernardino gunman’s iPhone? [Poll]
  • Civil rights groups and tech companies express support for Apple’s stand against the FBI
  • Opinion: Why an iPhone master key is better than a backdoor, but still too dangerous
  • Petition urges White House to support Apple in blocking government access to locked iPhones
  • Senate Intelligence Committee considering bill to penalize companies refusing to decrypt user device
  • Report: Apple to get more time to formally respond to government’s request for access to locked iPhone
  • Apple/FBI fight looks destined to go all the way to the Supreme Court as more background is revealed
  • Department of Justice files motion to force Apple to comply with FBI iPhone backdoor request
  • Apple implies FBI screwup: iPhone Apple ID password changed in govt possession, backdoor unnecessary
  • FBI explains why it changed Apple ID password in iPhone unlock case, retrieved iCloud backups up to October 19 but wants more
  • San Bernardino victims divided on iPhone issue as FBI claims not trying to set a precedent
  • Apple/FBI: Tim Cook sends memo to employees, wants government to drop All Writs Act demands, posts customer FAQ
  • Edward Snowden describes how the FBI could physically extract passcode from iPhone chip without Apple’s help
  • Mark Zuckerberg sides w/ Apple in encryption battle as poll suggests public supports FBI
  • Report says DOJ seeking data from ‘about’ 12 other iPhones as Bill Gates sides with FBI
  • Report: Apple to argue that encryption battle with FBI should be decided by Congress
  • Bloomberg: Apple will argue that the digital signature it uses to validate code is protected as free speech
  • Tim Cook says tool to unlock iPhone is the ‘software equivalent of cancer’ in new interview
  • Apple working on stronger iCloud backup encryption and iPhone security to counter FBI unlock requests
  • Apple’s top lawyer Bruce Sewell to testify before Congress over encryption next week
  • Apple officially responds to court request to comply with FBI in San Bernardino iPhone case
  • Report: Google, Twitter, Facebook, & Microsoft to file court motions officially supporting Apple in FBI fight
  • FBI director admits under oath that iPhone case would set a precedent; public & Republican candidates still on FBI side

Photo: The Verge

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