Despite being among a lot of safe mobile operating systems, iOS is no complete stranger to running into some severe hiccups sometimes. The most recent of the difficulties to have actually hit the OS is a newly discovered bug which can successfully crash any iPhone getting a specific string of text over SMS or iMessage. As it turns out, the bug is now known to have actually broken Snapchat, and Twitter also, and if you believed this is getting severe, there’s no convenience in knowing that Mac OS X is not any safer either.

Mac iphone

Let me just start out and state that the little bit of details up there is truly overwhelming offered how the news of the bug and its impact started. iOS is no unfamiliar person to periodic bugs, and while an iPhone just rebooting as it bows down to the a string of text appears severe, we have actually seen something comparable with WhatsApp in the past, though the iPhone was mostly invulnerable to that bug.

But with the bug broadening to other apps on iOS as well as posturing a risk to Apple’s desktop OS, this is progressing into a larger headache than Apple might have initially considered it out to be. The iPhone maker had actually even released a short-lived fix to the text/ iMessage crashing bug, but it looks like the bug has actually caught up lately.

Obviously, if you have Twitter alert made it possible for, any inbound direct message and even a public reference will certainly push your iPhone into retreat, as the phone restarts or crashes, though there is no enduring damage. On the other hand, Snapchat suffers a more dramatic end to it, as getting that notorious message will instantly crash the iPhone device when you attempt to open that discussion. Twice, thrice, you can try it once again and once more, but it will keep rebooting your phone – – according to TheGuardian.

The only instant remedy for this is to switch off alerts for Twitter and Snapchat and wait for Apple to release iOS 8.4 with fix – – which ought to be coming extremely quickly.


When it comes to Macs being vulnerable to this bug, and as pointed out by Forbes:“The problem depends on how Apple devices render characters in unicode, a widely-deployed requirement that uses binary code to represent text or script characters, referred to as glyphs.”

To put it simply, OS X and iOS are both bothered by the method they read these destructive characters. According to Mathew Hickey a security analyst at MDSec, it is uncertain which OS X apps and the number of are likely to be impacted by this bug, but “might include e-mail applications or other instantaneous messaging platforms, nevertheless at present only a small number of applications are known to be affected consisting of iOS SMS and OS X Terminal.”

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