Magellan merging GPS hardware and iOS

Magellan merging GPS hardware and iOS

Magellan has announced nationwide availability of its new SmartGPS device. The hardware GPS for cars mates with an iPhone via an iOS app to provide the in-car solution with several advantages, including connections to Yelp and Foursquare based on the user location. Live content includes fuel prices, traffic, local weather and traffic camera alerts. The hardware is initially available at Best Buy and sells for U.S> $249.00. The iOS app that provides the network links is free. You can find information for a destination on the Magellan app, then send it via Bluetooth to the GPS hardware in the car.

The reasoning is to blend the best parts of the smartphone experience with dedicated hardware. Success with this approach will depend upon whether people find the navigation solutions on their smartphones to be needing a boost from dedicated hardware.

Daily iPhone App: House of the Dead Overkill – The Lost Reels is gross but innovative

There are some really excellent apps arriving on the App Store tonight (including Firaxis’ great Haunted Hollow), but before we tackle that new crop, I did want to mention this app, released last week by Sega. House of the Dead, if you’re not aware, is an arcade shooting game, where you take on a whole haunted house full of zombies and demons with a light gun (and usually a friend, if you’re playing in an arcade with quarters). House of the Dead: Overkill was a version of the game that came to Nintendo’s Wii system a little while back, and this version, sub-subtitled The Lost Reels, is a revamp of that game, made specifically for iOS devices.

McDonald’s releases McPlay app: ‘Hey kids, this is advertising’

McDonald’s has awkwardly tried to enter the App Store marketplace with an app it calls “McPlay,” available for free on the App Store right now. I wouldn’t recommend a download (personally, I’ve boycotted the golden arches for almost a decade now), but it is fascinating to see the fast-food giant not quite understand how to do iOS-style marketing. The app is just one game at the moment, asking players to throw a ball into a Happy Meal box. And McDonald’s is obviously being as careful as it possibly can with this one. Not only is the app all about gathering nutritious food for kids, but there’s a “for parents” nutrition section, and as you can see in the screenshot above, the app proudly proclaims, “Hey kids, this is advertising!” Funny.

McDonald’s releases McPlay app: ‘Hey kids, this is advertising’

McDonald’s has awkwardly tried to enter the App Store marketplace with an app it calls “McPlay,” available for free on the App Store right now. I wouldn’t recommend a download (personally, I’ve boycotted the golden arches for almost a decade now), but it is fascinating to see the fast-food giant not quite understand how to do iOS-style marketing. The app is just one game at the moment, asking players to throw a ball into a Happy Meal box. And McDonald’s is obviously being as careful as it possibly can with this one. Not only is the app all about gathering nutritious food for kids, but there’s a “for parents” nutrition section, and as you can see in the screenshot above, the app proudly proclaims, “Hey kids, this is advertising!” Funny.

Tipping Point Adventure for iPad is clever and engaging

My experience as an adventure game player goes way back to the text-only Colossal Cave game, which then morphed into the classic Zork text games from Infocom (which, by the way, you can play even now on iOS with the Lost Treasures of Infocom app).

Now, with speed and graphic power, games are a lot more immersive and fun to play. Tipping Point Adventure, is a recent iPad-only release that is rich in puzzles and high quality graphics. The game is currently on sale for U.S. $1.99 in the app store. You begin the game sitting in your virtual home watching TV, when a strange message sets you off on an epic adventure. At first, I was stabbing around the screen looking for things to interact with, but soon I saw a logic to the way the game was constructed. I liked a lot of the subtle things the author has done, like picking up the TV remote and selecting stations has old movies actually playing on the TV. The game has built-in hints available for in-app purchase, and you don’t have to buy them, though I did have to pick up one or two. One hint told me I had to go to a particular TV channel for a message, and with hundreds of channels available, I don’t think I would have figured that one out for myself.

Pages: Prev 1 2 3 . . . 1759 1760 1761 1762 1763 . . . 4802 4803 Next