Best Apple Watch Series 3 Bands – leather, sport, nylon, loops, and more

Pre-orders for Apple Watch Series 3 officially went live this morning, and hopefully you were fortunate to get yours placed before shipping times started to slip. Whether this is your first wearable from Apple or you’re simply upgrading, you’ll likely want to buy a few extra bands for different occasions.

Any good 9to5Toys reader knows that Apple’s official first-party bands are way over-priced. While the quality is good, you can often find two or three nice alternatives on Amazon from other manufacturers for the price of one band at Apple. We’ve put together a list of our favorite bands below, covering a wide range of materials from leather and nylon to silicone and stainless steel. Head below for our top picks.

Thankfully when Apple introduced Series 3 on Tuesday, it didn’t change the physical design of the watch band lugs. That means nearly every option available on the market should have day one compatibility with Apple’s latest wearable.

I personally have about 15 different bands that I’ve collected over the last few years. Despite the inventory, I usually only stick with two or three. A sport band is a must-have, whether it’s Apple’s official Nike option (or a knock-off) as well as an alternative for dressier occasions. I’d recommend picking up at least two alternatives to whichever style ships with your Apple Watch as a starting point.

Apple announced last week that Burberry would be capturing its London fashion show that took place yesterday entirely with its new iPhone 5s, and today Burberry has posted the full video of the event. There’s no mention whether or not the full 15 minute long video above has been retouched after being shot on the iPhone, but Apple and Burberry say the entire show, including photos and video, was “shot exclusively on iPhone 5s.”

We’ve seen a few shots leak throughout the week already, but Pocket-Lint has an inside look at how Burberry’s photographers shot the show using 14 different iPhones and an interview with Burberry’s creative director Christopher Bailey:

Dotted around the room this year were 14 iPhone 5S smartphones recording and live streaming all the action to numerous destinations such as billboards and Burberry stores, as well as the usual social networking platforms like Facebook and Vine…There were nine iPhone 5S phones on the runway taking shots, three on a moving rail cam following the models, one on the roof getting all the action, and a further iPhone 5S on a jimmy rig outside for celeb shots. 

The iPhone 5s packs in a new camera system with a dual LED true tone flash, a new five-element lens designed by Apple, a F2.2 aperture, a sensor with a 15 percent larger active area, auto stabilization, and bigger 1.5 micron pixels. The camera also includes a new burst mode that will continuously take photos a rate of 10fps, and the 120fps slow mo mode that we reported about back in July.

iPhone 5s will officially go on sale in the US, Australia, China, Canada, Germany, France, Singapore, UK, and Japan on Friday, September 20.

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Screen Shot 2013-09-18 at 9.41.52 AM

iOS 7, Apple’s brand-new take on their mobile operating system, has been released to the public and is now available as an over-the-air update or through iTunes.

Below you’ll find a full walkthrough of many of the new features and changes throughout the overhauled OS, including a look at the built-in apps that received the biggest changes.

Before you can dive into everything that iOS 7 has to offer, you’ll need to update your device. You can find full directions for updating in our how-to from yesterday. Once you’re updated, check out all of the shiny new additions to the OS:

Features

Design

iOS 7 is full of changes big and small, but the most notable—and noticeable—is the all-new visual design. The long-revered design principles of Scott Forstall and Steve Jobs have been replaced with new ideas from Jony Ive. Gone are the gradients, stitched leather, and paper textures from previous versions of iOS.

In their place you’ll find plain white navigation bars and backgrounds paired with sharp-angled glyphs and borderless buttons. Transparent overlays resembling frosted glass are the closest thing you’ll find to a real-life surface in this update.

Along with the new interface comes a whole new set of icons. Unlike previous iOS icons, each of the built-in icons in this update are built on a common grid, giving the various elements consistent sizes and layouts.

We’ll discuss a few of the new built-in app designs below. Many third-party applications have also started adopting the new design language.

Control Center

control center

One of the most-requested features in iOS with each update has been the ability to quickly toggle common settings like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and Airplane Mode. While jailbroken iPhone and iPad owners have had these options for a long time, Apple has finally decided to give users access to quick toggles.

To activate Control Center, just swipe up from the bottom of any screen. You’ll have immediate access to toggles for Airplane Mode, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Do Not Disturb mode, and the rotation lock which was previously in the multitasking tray. You can also control your screen brightness, music playback, AirPlay and AirDrop functions, and quickly launch your camera, calculator, clock, or flashlight.

Multitasking

multitasking

Since many of the functions previously contained in the multitasking tray have been moved to Control Center, the multitasking interface was also redesigned and now includes no functionality besides switching and quitting apps.

Instead of the old  “dock”-like app switcher, double-clicking the Home button instead triggers a card-style app switcher that allows you to quickly swipe through your running apps. Tap any app to switch to it, or swipe it up to quit.

iTunes Radio

Music streaming services like Spotify and Rdio have become quite popular recently. These apps allow users to legally stream music without having to purchase it from the iTunes Store. Since the iTunes Store is a large source of income for Apple, the company has built it’s own Pandora-like service that allows users to create stations based on music they enjoy. The stations then stream similar music with intermittent ads.

While you can’t select specific songs to play from iTunes Radio, you can buy songs you like directly from the iTunes Store without leaving the Music app.

Subscribers to the $25/year iTunes Match service can listen to iTunes Radio ad-free.

AirDrop

airdrop

AirDrop on iOS functions very similarly to the feature of the same name on OS X. When you want to quickly share a file between nearby devices, you can use AirDrop to seamlessly transmit the file without having to go through email, iMessage, or other services.

AirDrop uses a combination of Bluetooth and Wi-Fi Direct to locate your friends, and connects to your iCloud contacts so that you can see your friends’ names and photos on the share sheet instead of random device identifiers or email addresses.

Notification Center Today view

notification center

Notification Center in iOS 7 has received a visual overhaul like the rest of the system, but now sports several new features, including a “Today” tab that shows relevant information to your day at a glance. You can get your weather, calendar events, stock ticker, and reminders all listed on one page.

Unfortunately, the page is a bit annoying to use. The weather is written out in a paragraph and doesn’t always contain the same information (some days it might list the high and low, other days it might not). The calendar no longer lists individual events, but instead contains a full-size day view of your calendar, forcing you to scroll through the whole page to tell whether you have any events. The same is true for the stocks widget, which no longer scrolls horizontally but instead lists all of your stocks vertically.

Thankfully you can toggle any of these sections off in the Settings app if you decide you don’t want to see them.

Multi-user Shared iCloud Photo Streams

Another much-requested feature that finally made it into a shipping version of iOS is the ability to have multiple contributors on a Shared Photo Stream. Previously only the creator of the Photo Stream could add anything to it, and others who were added only had the abilitiy to view the photos the creator had added.

With iOS 7, specific users can be granted the option to upload their own photos to a Photo Stream. This is especially useful for family photo albums or collaboration among a team.

Popular Nearby Apps

app store

The App Store in iOS 7 doesn’t boast very many new features outside of the design, but it did ditch the Genius tab in favor of a new Popular Nearby feature. This feature uses your current location to determine which apps are current among other users in the same area.

Lost Mode

Find My iPhone’s “Lost Mode” got a few tweaks in iOS 7 as well. When you add a message to the lock screen from the iCloud website or Find My iPhone app, you can also set a phone number to call. The screen displays a call button for whoever happens to have the phone, which automatically calls the number you specified so that they can return the phone to you.

Activation Lock

Another security feature for lost devices in iOS 7 is Activation Lock. If at any point your iDevice is erased using iTunes, Activation Lock requires your iTunes password before the phone or tablet can be used again. This ensures that even if your phone is stolen or found by someone who doesn’t intend to return it, they can’t use the phone without your password. Hopefully that will lead them to return it since it’s useless to them.

New services in Siri

Siri, the built-in personal assistant that debuted with the iPhone 4S, has learned a few new tricks in iOS 7. It can now search the web using Bing without launching Safari, find users or specific content on Twitter, and look up just about any subject on Wikipedia.

Built-in apps

All of the built-in apps in iOS 7 have been completely redesigned. Below you’ll find walkthroughs of the apps with the most changes from their iOS 6 counterparts.

Calendar

calendar

Calendar didn’t get very many new features in terms of functionality, but it did get an iPad-style overview of the entire year. Most of the new changes in iOS 7’s Calendar are visual. The new style introduces a few new ways to interact with your events, though.

Specifically, where previous versions of iOS showed the list of any given day’s events at the bottom of the screen when you tapped that day, iOS 7 instead “opens” the screen to reveal a list in a separate panel. This means that rather than simply tapping another day to view different events, you’ll need to tap the “back” button to return to the month view.

Photos

photos

Photos recieved several new features in iOS 7. The biggest is a new way to view your pictures as a “collection” sorted by time and location. You can even back out of these collections to view an entire year’s worth of photos as a single grid.

Another new feature—and perhaps the most useful addition to the app—is the ability to add multiple contributors to a Shared Photo Stream. Now you and your family members can create a common shared stream for reunions, or you and your friends can create a shared source of great iPhone wallpapers.

Camera

In iOS 7, Apple has finally jumped onboard with the photo filters trend. You can now select one of eight preset filters while taking a photo, or apply them later. If you don’t like how a filter looks on a photo, you can remove it or swap it for a different filter at any time, even after you’ve taken the photo and moved on.

Camera also has a new shooting mode called “Square” that does exactly what the name implies: it crops your photos to a square, much like Instagram has been doing for years. The method of switching shooting modes has also changed. Instead of a switch in the corner of the app, you switch modes by swiping the screen left or right.

Reminders

reminders

Gone is the leather-and-paper design of the old Reminders app. It has been replaced with an interface similar to that of Passbook, using cards for separate lists. Checkmarks have been replaced with colored circles. For the most part, if you’re familiar with Passbook in iOS 7, you’ll have a pretty good idea of how to use the new Reminders app.

Game Center

game center

Game Center got one of the most dramatic facelifts in iOS 7. The green felt and wood textures have been replaced with solid white. The old casino-inspired interface has given way to colored bubbles that animate and fly around when you tap them. Most of the functionality is the same, but the substantial visual changes can make it feel like there’s a lot of new stuff to see in the app.

Compass

compass

Like Game Center, Compass has ditched the wooden textures that previously made it resemble something you might find in a store. The new interface is black with a white dial. You can get a little more detail about your current location, and swiping to the left reveals a new level that is a bit confusing to use at first but quickly makes sense.

Safari

The new Safari update is mostly cosmetic, but there are some functional changes as well. Scrolling now hides the app’s controls like in Google Chrome on iOS. You can open an unlimited number of tabs, and scroll through them using a card-like view that looks sort of like a vertical Cover Flow.

Safari also has a new tab in the bookmarks panel that can show links shared by your friends on Twitter and other social sites.

Final thoughts

iOS 7 is the most ambitious release of iOS to date. Where the original iPhone operating system was developed over several years and constantly improved upon in design and function for six years after its release, iOS 7 was put designed and put together in a much shorter period of time. Apple has learned a lot from the past six years, and they still have much more to learn. Rebuilding something as widely known as iOS from the ground up in a year is a big undertaking, even before you consider the fact that they added over 200 new features.

Yes, there will be bugs. At this point, there should probably be fewer bugs than there are, but take into consideration the immense amount of work that went into redesigning an entire OS. Bugs can be fixed. The more important question about iOS 7 is not whether it will have problems, but whether Apple will solve them.

Apple set out to make iOS a simple as possible with this update. Some would say that they have achieved that goal. Others would say they’ve taken that goal too far. While Apple is pushing iOS 7 as the future of their mobile platform, iOS users are divided over the controversial approaches to whitespace, color, iconography, typography, transparency, and every other aspect of the new aesthetic.

Whether Apple listens to the criticisms of disappointed users, or pushes ahead with the backing of those who support their vision, iOS has been irreversibly changed. Only time will tell if that change will gain mainstream appreciation.

” data-medium-file=”” data-large-file=”” title=”Best Apple Watch Series 3 Bands – leather, sport, nylon, loops, and more” class=”aligncenter size-large wp-image-288109″ src=”https://9to5toys.files.wordpress.com/2017/09/x-doria.jpg?quality=82&strip=all&w=1000&strip=all” alt=”” width=”1000″ height=”500″/>

Apple has just released iOS 7 to the public Below you’ll find a full walkthrough of many of the new features and changes throughout the overhauled operating system, including a look at the built-in apps that received the biggest changes.

Before you can dive into everything that iOS 7 has to offer, you’ll need to update your device. You can find full directions for updating in our how-to from yesterday. Once you’re updated, check out all of the shiny new additions to the OS.

Features

Design

iOS 7 is full of changes big and small, but the most notable—and noticeable—is the all-new visual design. The long-revered design principles of Scott Forstall and Steve Jobs have been replaced with new ideas from Jony Ive. Gone are the gradients, stitched leather, and paper textures from previous versions of iOS.

In their place you’ll find plain white navigation bars and backgrounds paired with sharp-angled glyphs and borderless buttons. Transparent overlays resembling frosted glass are the closest thing you’ll find to a real-life surface in this update.

Along with the new interface comes a whole new set of icons. Unlike previous iOS icons, each of the built-in icons in this update are built on a common grid, giving the various elements consistent sizes and layouts.

We’ll discuss a few of the new built-in app designs below. Many third-party applications have also started adopting the new design language.

Control Center

One of the most-requested features in iOS with each update has been the ability to quickly toggle common settings like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and Airplane Mode. While jailbroken iPhone and iPad owners have had these options for a long time, Apple has finally decided to give users access to quick toggles.

To activate Control Center, just swipe up from the bottom of any screen. You’ll have immediate access to toggles for Airplane Mode, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Do Not Disturb mode, and the rotation lock which was previously in the multitasking tray. You can also control your screen brightness, music playback, AirPlay and AirDrop functions, and quickly launch your camera, calculator, clock, or flashlight.

Multitasking

Since many of the functions previously contained in the multitasking tray have been moved to Control Center, the multitasking interface was also redesigned and now includes no functionality besides switching and quitting apps.

Instead of the old  “dock”-like app switcher, double-clicking the Home button instead triggers a card-style app switcher that allows you to quickly swipe through your running apps. Tap any app to switch to it, or swipe it up to quit.

iTunes Radio

Music streaming services like Spotify and Rdio have become quite popular recently. These apps allow users to legally stream music without having to purchase it from the iTunes Store. Since the iTunes Store is a large source of income for Apple, the company has built it’s own Pandora-like service that allows users to create stations based on music they enjoy. The stations then stream similar music with intermittent ads.

While you can’t select specific songs to play from iTunes Radio, you can buy songs you like directly from the iTunes Store without leaving the Music app.

Subscribers to the $25/year iTunes Match service can listen to iTunes Radio ad-free.

AirDrop

AirDrop on iOS functions very similarly to the feature of the same name on OS X. When you want to quickly share a file between nearby devices, you can use AirDrop to seamlessly transmit the file without having to go through email, iMessage, or other services.

AirDrop uses a combination of Bluetooth and Wi-Fi Direct to locate your friends, and connects to your iCloud contacts so that you can see your friends’ names and photos on the share sheet instead of random device identifiers or email addresses.

Notification Center Today view

Notification Center in iOS 7 has received a visual overhaul like the rest of the system, but now sports several new features, including a “Today” tab that shows relevant information to your day at a glance. You can get your weather, calendar events, stock ticker, and reminders all listed on one page.

Unfortunately, the page is a bit annoying to use. The weather is written out in a paragraph and doesn’t always contain the same information (some days it might list the high and low, other days it might not). The calendar no longer lists individual events, but instead contains a full-size day view of your calendar, forcing you to scroll through the whole page to tell whether you have any events. The same is true for the stocks widget, which no longer scrolls horizontally but instead lists all of your stocks vertically.

Thankfully you can toggle any of these sections off in the Settings app if you decide you don’t want to see them.

Multi-user Shared iCloud Photo Streams

Another much-requested feature that finally made it into a shipping version of iOS is the ability to have multiple contributors on a Shared Photo Stream. Previously only the creator of the Photo Stream could add anything to it, and others who were added only had the abilitiy to view the photos the creator had added.

With iOS 7, specific users can be granted the option to upload their own photos to a Photo Stream. This is especially useful for family photo albums or collaboration among a team.

iCloud Keychain

Like OS X Mavericks, iOS 7 features support for iCloud Keychain. This allows you to store passwords securely in your iCloud account and sync them across all of your up-to-date Apple devices.

Popular Nearby Apps

The App Store in iOS 7 doesn’t boast very many new features outside of the design, but it did ditch the Genius tab in favor of a new Popular Nearby feature. This feature uses your current location to determine which apps are current among other users in the same area.

Lost Mode

Find My iPhone’s “Lost Mode” got a few tweaks in iOS 7 as well. When you add a message to the lock screen from the iCloud website or Find My iPhone app, you can also set a phone number to call. The screen displays a call button for whoever happens to have the phone, which automatically calls the number you specified so that they can return the phone to you.

Activation Lock

Another security feature for lost devices in iOS 7 is Activation Lock. If at any point your iDevice is erased using iTunes, Activation Lock requires your iTunes password before the phone or tablet can be used again. This ensures that even if your phone is stolen or found by someone who doesn’t intend to return it, they can’t use the phone without your password. Hopefully that will lead them to return it since it’s useless to them.

New services in Siri

Siri, the built-in personal assistant that debuted with the iPhone 4S, has learned a few new tricks in iOS 7. It can now search the web using Bing without launching Safari, find users or specific content on Twitter, and look up just about any subject on Wikipedia.

 

Built-in apps

All of the built-in apps in iOS 7 have been completely redesigned. Below you’ll find walkthroughs of the apps with the most changes from their iOS 6 counterparts.

Calendar

Calendar didn’t get very many new features in terms of functionality, but it did get an iPad-style overview of the entire year. Most of the new changes in iOS 7’s Calendar are visual. The new style introduces a few new ways to interact with your events, though.

Specifically, where previous versions of iOS showed the list of any given day’s events at the bottom of the screen when you tapped that day, iOS 7 instead “opens” the screen to reveal a list in a separate panel. This means that rather than simply tapping another day to view different events, you’ll need to tap the “back” button to return to the month view.

Photos

Photos recieved several new features in iOS 7. The biggest is a new way to view your pictures as a “collection” sorted by time and location. You can even back out of these collections to view an entire year’s worth of photos as a single grid.

Another new feature—and perhaps the most useful addition to the app—is the ability to add multiple contributors to a Shared Photo Stream. Now you and your family members can create a common shared stream for reunions, or you and your friends can create a shared source of great iPhone wallpapers.

Camera

In iOS 7, Apple has finally jumped onboard with the photo filters trend. You can now select one of eight preset filters while taking a photo, or apply them later. If you don’t like how a filter looks on a photo, you can remove it or swap it for a different filter at any time, even after you’ve taken the photo and moved on.

Camera also has a new shooting mode called “Square” that does exactly what the name implies: it crops your photos to a square, much like Instagram has been doing for years. The method of switching shooting modes has also changed. Instead of a switch in the corner of the app, you switch modes by swiping the screen left or right.

Reminders

Gone is the leather-and-paper design of the old Reminders app. It has been replaced with an interface similar to that of Passbook, using cards for separate lists. Checkmarks have been replaced with colored circles. For the most part, if you’re familiar with Passbook in iOS 7, you’ll have a pretty good idea of how to use the new Reminders app.

Game Center

Game Center got one of the most dramatic facelifts in iOS 7. The green felt and wood textures have been replaced with solid white. The old casino-inspired interface has given way to colored bubbles that animate and fly around when you tap them. Most of the functionality is the same, but the substantial visual changes can make it feel like there’s a lot of new stuff to see in the app.

Compass

Like Game Center, Compass has ditched the wooden textures that previously made it resemble something you might find in a store. The new interface is black with a white dial. You can get a little more detail about your current location, and swiping to the left reveals a new level that is a bit confusing to use at first but quickly makes sense.

Safari

The new Safari update is mostly cosmetic, but there are some functional changes as well. Scrolling now hides the app’s controls like in Google Chrome on iOS. You can open an unlimited number of tabs, and scroll through them using a card-like view that looks sort of like a vertical Cover Flow.

Safari also has a new tab in the bookmarks panel that can show links shared by your friends on Twitter and other social sites.

” data-medium-file=”” data-large-file=”” title=”Best Apple Watch Series 3 Bands – leather, sport, nylon, loops, and more” class=”aligncenter size-large wp-image-288110″ src=”https://9to5toys.files.wordpress.com/2017/09/apple-watch-straps.jpg?quality=82&strip=all&w=1000&strip=all” alt=”” width=”1000″ height=”308″/>

When iOS 7 was announced Twitterrific users and industry critics alike remarked how well the design of v5 of the app already fit with the overall aesthetic of the new OS. Once we actually got used to iOS7 we noticed a lot of design and interaction details that could be improved based on what Apple had done. Visually and structurally we were surprisingly close to the mark, so that gave us more time to focus on overhauling the details of the interface and interactions as well as making sure the backend was taking advantage of all the latest APIs.

Specific visual aspects of iOS 7 that have been adopted in Twitterrific 5.3 include the removal of many of the button containers, subtle gradients as well as the rounded corners of dialogs and views have also been removed. The overall color scheme of the app has been changed to adopt the familiar tints of iOS 7 controls. Content is still front and center in the design overall but elements such as Twitterrific’s dark theme, sidebar and compose screens now reflect the more light-weight design approach that users will be seeing on 7’s launch day.

— Gedeon Maheux, Designer at the Iconfactory

” data-medium-file=”” data-large-file=”” title=”Best Apple Watch Series 3 Bands – leather, sport, nylon, loops, and more” class=”aligncenter size-large wp-image-288157″ src=”https://9to5toys.files.wordpress.com/2017/09/burkley-watch-cuff.jpg?quality=82&strip=all&w=1000&strip=all” alt=”” width=”1000″ height=”500″/>

Apple has just released iOS 7 to the public Below you’ll find a full walkthrough of many of the new features and changes throughout the overhauled operating system, including a look at the built-in apps that received the biggest changes.

Before you can dive into everything that iOS 7 has to offer, you’ll need to update your device. You can find full directions for updating in our how-to from yesterday. Once you’re updated, check out all of the shiny new additions to the OS.

Features

Design

iOS 7 is full of changes big and small, but the most notable—and noticeable—is the all-new visual design. The long-revered design principles of Scott Forstall and Steve Jobs have been replaced with new ideas from Jony Ive. Gone are the gradients, stitched leather, and paper textures from previous versions of iOS.

In their place you’ll find plain white navigation bars and backgrounds paired with sharp-angled glyphs and borderless buttons. Transparent overlays resembling frosted glass are the closest thing you’ll find to a real-life surface in this update.

Along with the new interface comes a whole new set of icons. Unlike previous iOS icons, each of the built-in icons in this update are built on a common grid, giving the various elements consistent sizes and layouts.

We’ll discuss a few of the new built-in app designs below. Many third-party applications have also started adopting the new design language.

Control Center

control center

One of the most-requested features in iOS with each update has been the ability to quickly toggle common settings like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and Airplane Mode. While jailbroken iPhone and iPad owners have had these options for a long time, Apple has finally decided to give users access to quick toggles.

To activate Control Center, just swipe up from the bottom of any screen. You’ll have immediate access to toggles for Airplane Mode, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Do Not Disturb mode, and the rotation lock which was previously in the multitasking tray. You can also control your screen brightness, music playback, AirPlay and AirDrop functions, and quickly launch your camera, calculator, clock, or flashlight.

Multitasking

multitasking

Since many of the functions previously contained in the multitasking tray have been moved to Control Center, the multitasking interface was also redesigned and now includes no functionality besides switching and quitting apps.

Instead of the old  “dock”-like app switcher, double-clicking the Home button instead triggers a card-style app switcher that allows you to quickly swipe through your running apps. Tap any app to switch to it, or swipe it up to quit.

iTunes Radio

Music streaming services like Spotify and Rdio have become quite popular recently. These apps allow users to legally stream music without having to purchase it from the iTunes Store. Since the iTunes Store is a large source of income for Apple, the company has built it’s own Pandora-like service that allows users to create stations based on music they enjoy. The stations then stream similar music with intermittent ads.

While you can’t select specific songs to play from iTunes Radio, you can buy songs you like directly from the iTunes Store without leaving the Music app.

Subscribers to the $25/year iTunes Match service can listen to iTunes Radio ad-free.

AirDrop

airdrop

AirDrop on iOS functions very similarly to the feature of the same name on OS X. When you want to quickly share a file between nearby devices, you can use AirDrop to seamlessly transmit the file without having to go through email, iMessage, or other services.

AirDrop uses a combination of Bluetooth and Wi-Fi Direct to locate your friends, and connects to your iCloud contacts so that you can see your friends’ names and photos on the share sheet instead of random device identifiers or email addresses.

Notification Center Today view

notification center

Notification Center in iOS 7 has received a visual overhaul like the rest of the system, but now sports several new features, including a “Today” tab that shows relevant information to your day at a glance. You can get your weather, calendar events, stock ticker, and reminders all listed on one page.

Unfortunately, the page is a bit annoying to use. The weather is written out in a paragraph and doesn’t always contain the same information (some days it might list the high and low, other days it might not). The calendar no longer lists individual events, but instead contains a full-size day view of your calendar, forcing you to scroll through the whole page to tell whether you have any events. The same is true for the stocks widget, which no longer scrolls horizontally but instead lists all of your stocks vertically.

Thankfully you can toggle any of these sections off in the Settings app if you decide you don’t want to see them.

Multi-user Shared iCloud Photo Streams

Another much-requested feature that finally made it into a shipping version of iOS is the ability to have multiple contributors on a Shared Photo Stream. Previously only the creator of the Photo Stream could add anything to it, and others who were added only had the abilitiy to view the photos the creator had added.

With iOS 7, specific users can be granted the option to upload their own photos to a Photo Stream. This is especially useful for family photo albums or collaboration among a team.

Popular Nearby Apps

app store

The App Store in iOS 7 doesn’t boast very many new features outside of the design, but it did ditch the Genius tab in favor of a new Popular Nearby feature. This feature uses your current location to determine which apps are current among other users in the same area.

Lost Mode

Find My iPhone’s “Lost Mode” got a few tweaks in iOS 7 as well. When you add a message to the lock screen from the iCloud website or Find My iPhone app, you can also set a phone number to call. The screen displays a call button for whoever happens to have the phone, which automatically calls the number you specified so that they can return the phone to you.

Activation Lock

Another security feature for lost devices in iOS 7 is Activation Lock. If at any point your iDevice is erased using iTunes, Activation Lock requires your iTunes password before the phone or tablet can be used again. This ensures that even if your phone is stolen or found by someone who doesn’t intend to return it, they can’t use the phone without your password. Hopefully that will lead them to return it since it’s useless to them.

New services in Siri

Siri, the built-in personal assistant that debuted with the iPhone 4S, has learned a few new tricks in iOS 7. It can now search the web using Bing without launching Safari, find users or specific content on Twitter, and look up just about any subject on Wikipedia.

Built-in apps

All of the built-in apps in iOS 7 have been completely redesigned. Below you’ll find walkthroughs of the apps with the most changes from their iOS 6 counterparts.

Calendar

calendar

Calendar didn’t get very many new features in terms of functionality, but it did get an iPad-style overview of the entire year. Most of the new changes in iOS 7’s Calendar are visual. The new style introduces a few new ways to interact with your events, though.

Specifically, where previous versions of iOS showed the list of any given day’s events at the bottom of the screen when you tapped that day, iOS 7 instead “opens” the screen to reveal a list in a separate panel. This means that rather than simply tapping another day to view different events, you’ll need to tap the “back” button to return to the month view.

Photos

photos

Photos recieved several new features in iOS 7. The biggest is a new way to view your pictures as a “collection” sorted by time and location. You can even back out of these collections to view an entire year’s worth of photos as a single grid.

Another new feature—and perhaps the most useful addition to the app—is the ability to add multiple contributors to a Shared Photo Stream. Now you and your family members can create a common shared stream for reunions, or you and your friends can create a shared source of great iPhone wallpapers.

Camera

In iOS 7, Apple has finally jumped onboard with the photo filters trend. You can now select one of eight preset filters while taking a photo, or apply them later. If you don’t like how a filter looks on a photo, you can remove it or swap it for a different filter at any time, even after you’ve taken the photo and moved on.

Camera also has a new shooting mode called “Square” that does exactly what the name implies: it crops your photos to a square, much like Instagram has been doing for years. The method of switching shooting modes has also changed. Instead of a switch in the corner of the app, you switch modes by swiping the screen left or right.

Reminders

reminders

Gone is the leather-and-paper design of the old Reminders app. It has been replaced with an interface similar to that of Passbook, using cards for separate lists. Checkmarks have been replaced with colored circles. For the most part, if you’re familiar with Passbook in iOS 7, you’ll have a pretty good idea of how to use the new Reminders app.

Game Center

game center

Game Center got one of the most dramatic facelifts in iOS 7. The green felt and wood textures have been replaced with solid white. The old casino-inspired interface has given way to colored bubbles that animate and fly around when you tap them. Most of the functionality is the same, but the substantial visual changes can make it feel like there’s a lot of new stuff to see in the app.

Compass

compass

Like Game Center, Compass has ditched the wooden textures that previously made it resemble something you might find in a store. The new interface is black with a white dial. You can get a little more detail about your current location, and swiping to the left reveals a new level that is a bit confusing to use at first but quickly makes sense.

Safari

The new Safari update is mostly cosmetic, but there are some functional changes as well. Scrolling now hides the app’s controls like in Google Chrome on iOS. You can open an unlimited number of tabs, and scroll through them using a card-like view that looks sort of like a vertical Cover Flow.

Safari also has a new tab in the bookmarks panel that can show links shared by your friends on Twitter and other social sites.

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Apple has just released iOS 7 to the public Below you’ll find a full walkthrough of many of the new features and changes throughout the overhauled operating system, including a look at the built-in apps that received the biggest changes.

Before you can dive into everything that iOS 7 has to offer, you’ll need to update your device. You can find full directions for updating in our how-to from yesterday. Once you’re updated, check out all of the shiny new additions to the OS.

Features

Design

iOS 7 is full of changes big and small, but the most notable—and noticeable—is the all-new visual design. The long-revered design principles of Scott Forstall and Steve Jobs have been replaced with new ideas from Jony Ive. Gone are the gradients, stitched leather, and paper textures from previous versions of iOS.

In their place you’ll find plain white navigation bars and backgrounds paired with sharp-angled glyphs and borderless buttons. Transparent overlays resembling frosted glass are the closest thing you’ll find to a real-life surface in this update.

Along with the new interface comes a whole new set of icons. Unlike previous iOS icons, each of the built-in icons in this update are built on a common grid, giving the various elements consistent sizes and layouts.

We’ll discuss a few of the new built-in app designs below. Many third-party applications have also started adopting the new design language.

Control Center

control center

One of the most-requested features in iOS with each update has been the ability to quickly toggle common settings like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and Airplane Mode. While jailbroken iPhone and iPad owners have had these options for a long time, Apple has finally decided to give users access to quick toggles.

To activate Control Center, just swipe up from the bottom of any screen. You’ll have immediate access to toggles for Airplane Mode, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Do Not Disturb mode, and the rotation lock which was previously in the multitasking tray. You can also control your screen brightness, music playback, AirPlay and AirDrop functions, and quickly launch your camera, calculator, clock, or flashlight.

Multitasking

multitasking

Since many of the functions previously contained in the multitasking tray have been moved to Control Center, the multitasking interface was also redesigned and now includes no functionality besides switching and quitting apps.

Instead of the old  “dock”-like app switcher, double-clicking the Home button instead triggers a card-style app switcher that allows you to quickly swipe through your running apps. Tap any app to switch to it, or swipe it up to quit.

iTunes Radio

Music streaming services like Spotify and Rdio have become quite popular recently. These apps allow users to legally stream music without having to purchase it from the iTunes Store. Since the iTunes Store is a large source of income for Apple, the company has built it’s own Pandora-like service that allows users to create stations based on music they enjoy. The stations then stream similar music with intermittent ads.

While you can’t select specific songs to play from iTunes Radio, you can buy songs you like directly from the iTunes Store without leaving the Music app.

Subscribers to the $25/year iTunes Match service can listen to iTunes Radio ad-free.

AirDrop

airdrop

AirDrop on iOS functions very similarly to the feature of the same name on OS X. When you want to quickly share a file between nearby devices, you can use AirDrop to seamlessly transmit the file without having to go through email, iMessage, or other services.

AirDrop uses a combination of Bluetooth and Wi-Fi Direct to locate your friends, and connects to your iCloud contacts so that you can see your friends’ names and photos on the share sheet instead of random device identifiers or email addresses.

Notification Center Today view

notification center

Notification Center in iOS 7 has received a visual overhaul like the rest of the system, but now sports several new features, including a “Today” tab that shows relevant information to your day at a glance. You can get your weather, calendar events, stock ticker, and reminders all listed on one page.

Unfortunately, the page is a bit annoying to use. The weather is written out in a paragraph and doesn’t always contain the same information (some days it might list the high and low, other days it might not). The calendar no longer lists individual events, but instead contains a full-size day view of your calendar, forcing you to scroll through the whole page to tell whether you have any events. The same is true for the stocks widget, which no longer scrolls horizontally but instead lists all of your stocks vertically.

Thankfully you can toggle any of these sections off in the Settings app if you decide you don’t want to see them.

Multi-user Shared iCloud Photo Streams

Another much-requested feature that finally made it into a shipping version of iOS is the ability to have multiple contributors on a Shared Photo Stream. Previously only the creator of the Photo Stream could add anything to it, and others who were added only had the abilitiy to view the photos the creator had added.

With iOS 7, specific users can be granted the option to upload their own photos to a Photo Stream. This is especially useful for family photo albums or collaboration among a team.

Popular Nearby Apps

app store

The App Store in iOS 7 doesn’t boast very many new features outside of the design, but it did ditch the Genius tab in favor of a new Popular Nearby feature. This feature uses your current location to determine which apps are current among other users in the same area.

Lost Mode

Find My iPhone’s “Lost Mode” got a few tweaks in iOS 7 as well. When you add a message to the lock screen from the iCloud website or Find My iPhone app, you can also set a phone number to call. The screen displays a call button for whoever happens to have the phone, which automatically calls the number you specified so that they can return the phone to you.

Activation Lock

Another security feature for lost devices in iOS 7 is Activation Lock. If at any point your iDevice is erased using iTunes, Activation Lock requires your iTunes password before the phone or tablet can be used again. This ensures that even if your phone is stolen or found by someone who doesn’t intend to return it, they can’t use the phone without your password. Hopefully that will lead them to return it since it’s useless to them.

New services in Siri

Siri, the built-in personal assistant that debuted with the iPhone 4S, has learned a few new tricks in iOS 7. It can now search the web using Bing without launching Safari, find users or specific content on Twitter, and look up just about any subject on Wikipedia.

Built-in apps

All of the built-in apps in iOS 7 have been completely redesigned. Below you’ll find walkthroughs of the apps with the most changes from their iOS 6 counterparts.

Calendar

calendar

Calendar didn’t get very many new features in terms of functionality, but it did get an iPad-style overview of the entire year. Most of the new changes in iOS 7’s Calendar are visual. The new style introduces a few new ways to interact with your events, though.

Specifically, where previous versions of iOS showed the list of any given day’s events at the bottom of the screen when you tapped that day, iOS 7 instead “opens” the screen to reveal a list in a separate panel. This means that rather than simply tapping another day to view different events, you’ll need to tap the “back” button to return to the month view.

Photos

photos

Photos recieved several new features in iOS 7. The biggest is a new way to view your pictures as a “collection” sorted by time and location. You can even back out of these collections to view an entire year’s worth of photos as a single grid.

Another new feature—and perhaps the most useful addition to the app—is the ability to add multiple contributors to a Shared Photo Stream. Now you and your family members can create a common shared stream for reunions, or you and your friends can create a shared source of great iPhone wallpapers.

Camera

In iOS 7, Apple has finally jumped onboard with the photo filters trend. You can now select one of eight preset filters while taking a photo, or apply them later. If you don’t like how a filter looks on a photo, you can remove it or swap it for a different filter at any time, even after you’ve taken the photo and moved on.

Camera also has a new shooting mode called “Square” that does exactly what the name implies: it crops your photos to a square, much like Instagram has been doing for years. The method of switching shooting modes has also changed. Instead of a switch in the corner of the app, you switch modes by swiping the screen left or right.

Reminders

reminders

Gone is the leather-and-paper design of the old Reminders app. It has been replaced with an interface similar to that of Passbook, using cards for separate lists. Checkmarks have been replaced with colored circles. For the most part, if you’re familiar with Passbook in iOS 7, you’ll have a pretty good idea of how to use the new Reminders app.

Game Center

game center

Game Center got one of the most dramatic facelifts in iOS 7. The green felt and wood textures have been replaced with solid white. The old casino-inspired interface has given way to colored bubbles that animate and fly around when you tap them. Most of the functionality is the same, but the substantial visual changes can make it feel like there’s a lot of new stuff to see in the app.

Compass

compass

Like Game Center, Compass has ditched the wooden textures that previously made it resemble something you might find in a store. The new interface is black with a white dial. You can get a little more detail about your current location, and swiping to the left reveals a new level that is a bit confusing to use at first but quickly makes sense.

Safari

The new Safari update is mostly cosmetic, but there are some functional changes as well. Scrolling now hides the app’s controls like in Google Chrome on iOS. You can open an unlimited number of tabs, and scroll through them using a card-like view that looks sort of like a vertical Cover Flow.

Safari also has a new tab in the bookmarks panel that can show links shared by your friends on Twitter and other social sites.

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iPhone5S-Feb-2013

There have been many rumors this year about what upgrades Apple will include in its anticipated annual iPhone refresh. Most agree Apple will move to release two iPhones, but there is some debate about what those phones will be.

Rumor has it Apple is working on a low-cost iPhone that will do away with the current iPhone design and instead use a brand-new plastic case with a curved back similar to previous iPods. Despite being a less expensive device, that could make things even trickier for Apple to impress with an iPhone 5S upgrade that is largely expected to retain the “old” design of the currently shipping iPhone 5. Making things even more difficult for Apple’s expected “S” upgrade is devices from competitors. Rumors of a 4.8-inch iPhone prototype that recently surfaced don’t seem likely for the next iPhone, but that hasn’t stopped mainstream media and analysts from reporting that Apple is losing out on iPhone sales as consumers opt for larger screen devices. Will consumers want/expect a larger screen on the next iPhone? Or will Apple’s usual minor refresh suffice?

What did past S upgrades have?

Looking at past “S” iPhones, Apple typically includes a few major upgrades: a faster processor, improved camera, and new software features that usually take advantage of the faster CPU. The iPhone 3GS included a better 3 megapixel camera with autofocus and video recording, a faster processor, and new apps such as voice control, a built-in compass, and VoiceOver. The iPhone 4S included a new dual-core A5 chip, an updated 8 megapixel camera and, on the app side, Siri. This is a good way to gauge the most likely new features of the iPhone 5S, but will just an “S” upgrade be enough to combat the increasingly enticing 5-inch Android-powered competition? Historically Apple has kept the same physical design as the previous generation iPhone when introducing an “S” upgrade. However, one way Apple could change that pattern is with the introduction of multiple colors for the iPhone like it’s done with iPod products.

Anostyle-iPhone5-pinkColors- For a long time we’ve heard predictions that Apple could introduce iPhones in colors other than black and white, and in recent months analysts have predicted it is coming with the iPhone 5S. Apple already has its new aluminum iPod touch line in multiple colors, and it would certainly be one of the standout features to attract users if the 5S is lacking an innovative new software feature like Siri on the 4S.

Software features- One way Apple could make the 5S upgrade an attractive offering is by including software features exclusive to the device. Apple has done this in the past. For example, making voice control and video recording features exclusive to the iPhone 3GS, and Siri on the iPhone 4S. iOS 7 is coming at some point in the second half of this year and on top of the usual long list of new features, most are hoping it includes a redesign of some of Apple’s aging stock apps. However, which of those features could Apple make exclusive to the iPhone 5S? Apps and features that might require upgraded hardware such as fingerprint sensor, NFC, and a faster CPU are likely candidates:

Siri-Offline-Not-Available-01Offline Siri– One big feature that Apple could introduce that would take advantage of the expected faster CPU is an offline mode for Siri. Apple’s still in beta service currently requires users to connect to Apple’s servers to perform tasks, and that has been a frustration for users that just want to use dictation, control music, launch apps, or place calls without an internet connection. Apple could take advantage of a faster CPU to bring some of the processing for certain Siri and dictation features locally to the device to allow for offline use. Many users have noticed some of these features, such as offline dictation, are already available on Android devices. Offline mode could also increase response time for Siri, something that’s noticeably behind Google’s Now feature.

NFC- Some analysts are saying that Apple will finally include an NFC chip in the iPhone 5S. It’s certainly not the first time we’ve heard rumors of NFC– Apple seemed to be toying with the idea in the past– but Android manufacturers are increasingly highlighting NFC-based payments, content sharing, and wireless charging as flagship features of most high-end Android devices. If Apple brought NFC capabilities to PassBook, and possibly even decided process payments with the hundreds of millions of credit cards connected to iTunes accounts, it could have a serious Google Wallet competitor.

Validity-Fingerprint-sensorFingerprint sensor- Apple last year acquired Authentec, a company that owns patents related to fingerprint sensors and related technology, so it’s only natural we hear rumors that the iPhone 5S could include a fingerprint sensor. Although there have been some Android devices to implement fingerprint sensors for security features, like the Motorola Atrix, an iPhone with a fingerprint sensor and apps that go beyond simply unlocking the device could definitely be the 5S’s big new exclusive feature. At CES this year we saw a company called Validity showing off its under-glass fingerprint sensors for smartphones on Android devices, as pictured above. The technology worked well, can be implemented into buttons in addition to under glass, and could also serve as an authentication solution for payments and more.

BlackBerry-FaceRewindCamera- Another obvious upgrade Apple will likely make in its 5S upgrade is the camera. Earlier reports claimed Apple will bump up the current 8 megapixel camera in the iPhone 5 to one of Sony’s 13 megapixel camera sensors and also include a larger, improved rear flash. With many of the new high-end Android devices packing in 12 and 13 megapixel cameras, any camera upgrades will probably be a big focus for Apple when announcing the 5S. I’d also expect new software camera features to make an appearance. Android 4.2 introduced an impressive 360° Photos Sphere feature, and BlackBerry showed off the rewind technology it grabbed from Scalado in addition to Instagram-like filters for the BB10 launch earlier this week. Apple’s panorama mode and camera app isn’t exactly looking as impressive as it did when iOS 6 launched last year. Another possibility for the camera, although a long shot, is a dedicated hardware shutter button. While the volume button lets you snap a photo when the camera app is open, it would be significantly quicker to be able to instantly snap a photo with a press of a button from anywhere. Although not likely based on past patterns, Apple could bump up the specs on the 1.2 megapixel FaceTime camera to support 1080p video recording, which would be ideal for FaceTime over cellular.

Memory- An upgrade in storage wouldn’t be that surprising given Apple has used past S upgrades to do the same– the 3GS replaced 8GB and 16GB models with 16GB and 32GB, while the 4S was accompanied by the introduction of a 64GB model. With Apple’s recently announced 128GB iPad, it wouldn’t be too shocking if the next-gen iPhone gets the same upgrade.

When will it launch? Again, if Apple sticks to the same schedule as release cycles in recent years, we’d likely see the iPhone 5S in the fall. Apple has moved its iPhone releases to fall with the 4S in October, 2011 and iPhone 5 in September of last year. However, this year there are rumors of a possible spring/early summer refresh, with several analysts claiming Apple will begin production of the 5S in March for a June or July launch. In theory that would make room for a major refresh in October or September roughly a year after the iPhone 5. That would of course mean Apple would break tradition and move to a bi-yearly release cycle, but still doesn’t account for the rumored low-cost iPhone. If Apple does launch a new iPhone in spring, it could also mean that the launch of the device on T-Mobile becomes a major part of the announcement.

If history is any indication, a fall release seems likely for the iPhone 5S. If Apple sticks to its past release patterns, the current iPhone 5 would see a price drop, and could also be modified slightly if rumors of a low-cost iPhone are true. In other words, the current iPhone 5 would become Apple’s lower priced iPhone, while the iPhone 5S would get the $199 entry pricing like every new iPhone before it. This would be the obvious scenario if Apple doesn’t decide to make any major changes to its release cycles, the question is what will Apple have to include in the device to impress consumers with another “S” iPhone?

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9to5Toys.com:

A large majority of the deals we cover each day come from a variety of ‘Daily Deal’ websites or are so popular that they don’t even last 24 hours. We know you can’t be at your computer every second, so we’re going to round up the best deals each day to make sure you have a fair shot at the deals you want. Be sure to follow 9to5Toys.com so you never miss a deal... Twitter, RSS Feed, Facebook, Google+.

Today’s featured deals:

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SOLD OUT PNY 64GB StorEdge MacBook SD card: $50 shipped

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Belkin Charge & Sync Lightning dock w/ built-in 4′ USB cable $25 Shipped (Reg. $40)

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The Flexibits Mini Mac Bundle: Fantastical & Chatology $20 (Reg. $40)

Other great deals from today:

  • New! Logitech keyboards, mice, webcams and handsets sale at Amazon – Solar Keyboard K760: $45, Wireless Keyboard/Mouse: $20 shipped
  • New! Logitech Harmony smart control w/ iOS integration and simple remote $80 shipped (Reg. $130)
  • New! Grand Theft V ‘iFruit’ companion app lets you customize in-game cars, train Chop the dog
  • New! Drobo Mini 4-bay 2.5-inch Thunderbolt/USB 3 enclosure: $300 shipped
  • New! 1-year magazine subscriptions: Architectural Digest: $6 (Reg. $60), Arts & Crafts Homes: $7 (Reg. $28), Apple Magazine $20, More
  • New! Toshiba 3TB 7200rpm hard drive + 16GB USB stick: $92 shipped
  • New! Game/App Deals: Bioshock Infinite: $30 shipped, Ubisoft Bundle: $20, iOS freebies, more
  • New! Roku 2 XD streaming player w/ bonus remote (refurb): $45 + $5 shipping (Reg. $80)

The best deals that are still alive:

  • Borderlands 2 download for $11.99
  • Virgin slashes 8GB iPhone 4 to $199, (4S: 20% off) unsubsidized w/$30/month unlimited data plan
  • $20 Ubisoft game bundle ($100 savings): Assassin’s Creed Brotherhood, AC 2, Driver San Francisco, Heroes of Might & Magic V, more
  • Trade in ANY old iPhone case and get $15 credit towards a new one from Incase
  • Camtasia/Crossover/+8 other Mac apps for $10, AfterShot Pro+10 apps: $49

New product announcements & reviews:

  • ChargeKey is a USB Lightning charging cable on your key ring
  • Steam Family Sharing lets you share and borrow full game libraries, launches next week
  • Sony launches new mini home console, the Playstation Vita TV
  • Amazon announces the all-new Kindle Paperwhite e-reader, now available for preorder starting at $119

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